Board Members

Terence (Terry) Grose

Terence (Terry) Grose

Terry Grose has a strong commercial background gained through his experience as a merchant banker, senior executive and business consultant in Australia and overseas.

Terry has been on the board of Yirra Yaakin Aboriginal Theatre Company for a decade. He is an Ambassador for Community First Development (formerly known as Indigenous Community Volunteers) and has carried out assignments for them in the Kimberley and Gascoyne regions and in Arnhem Land.

He is currently chair of Central Desert Native Title Services and Desert Support Services.

Earlier in his career Terry spent time as a merchant banker before joining Wesfarmers where he worked for a decade in a range of senior management positions, before moving to Hong Kong where he was CFO of an innovative computer software company for three years before establishing Grose International, a commercial and financial consultancy operating in Hong Kong and through Asia.

Sharon Reynolds

Sharon Reynolds

Sharon Reynolds is a member of Esperance Noongar and her family also has a strong historical connection with Kalgoorlie. Sharon commenced her career with the Australian Public Service in Kalgoorlie and has spent the past twenty years working in native title related areas, initially as a Claims Case Manager at the National Native Title Tribunal and more recently as a Senior Adviser and Indigenous Affairs Manager in the resources and oil & gas sectors. She has completed postgraduate certificates in Social Impact from UWA and Human Rights from Curtin University and is currently undertaking a Master of Human Rights. Sharon is committed to achieving the highest form of recognition for Aboriginal people and maximising native title outcomes.

Dr Carolyn Tan

Dr Carolyn Tan

Carolyn Tan has been an In-house Legal Counsel at Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation, the native title representative body for the Pilbara and Geraldton regions, since 2003. Prior to that she was a litigation partner at Dwyer Durack for 15 years and headed up their Native Title Department, as well as practising in commercial, administrative and other civil and industrial litigation. Carolyn has also been a Director of Central Desert Native Title Services Ltd since 2012. She holds a PhD for her research on a topic related to Indigenous heritage and religious freedom laws in Australia, New Zealand, USA and Canada.

Kado Muir

Kado Muir

Mr Kado Muir is a Wati, a Goldfields Aboriginal cultural and community leader and an anthropologist/archaeologist with many years’ experience working in Aboriginal Heritage, Language preservation and maintenance, traditional ecological/education and native title research.

Kado is currently deputy Chair of the National Native Title Council and chair of the Wakamurru Aboriginal Corporation RNTBC, the PBC for Manta Rirrtinya Native Title Determination. The former founding CEO of the Goldfields Land and Sea Council, Kado joins the NTSG board with a wealth of networks, understanding and insight for native title in the Goldfields region.

Kado operates a number of businesses including an Aboriginal art business, a Sandalwood company, and a heritage consultancy business. He is a long-time activist for bi-lingual and two way education, environmental and cultural heritage protection and promoting alternative community based enterprises, especially through his PhD university partnerships for research on Wealth in First Nations.

Kado grew up from an early age living in the bush and his passion is to “look after country, community and culture”.

Hon. Fred Chaney AO

Hon. Fred Chaney AO

Fred Chaney has been involved with Aboriginal people’s issues since 1960 including as a student advocating voting rights, a lawyer representing defendants and supporting the establishment of the Aboriginal Legal Service, a politician including as Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, and Member and sometime Deputy President of the National Native Title Tribunal, in the provision of native title services, in national and Western Australian reconciliation, in supporting constitutional recognition, and in supporting Aboriginal students. Across that period he has tried always to support Aboriginal aspirations for cultural social and economic recognition and advancement.